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Law Career Advice Roundup: Going To Law School, Mental Strength, and Finding Jobs

2013_ABA_Blawg100Honoree_250x250After skipping Thanksgiving weekend, I have a lot of great law career advice for you, along with interesting debates about law school. But first, we made the ABA Blawg 100! Please vote for JDCOT as your favorite here. Now to that advice….

What does it take to be an employable law school graduate? The headline of this WSJ Law blog post sums it up: A ‘people person’ who can do research.’

Gain insight into those soft skills with our professional development videos. Check out last week’s posts on client development and networking in particular to see what it means to be a ‘people person’ in law.

Usually you have to work in a firm before going in-house, but that might be changing. The catch? These jobs for new law school grads don’t pay much – $38,000. Would you go for such a job?

If you’re on the job market or soon will be, check out what’s hot in the legal market from Attorney at Work.

Law school hatred reaches new levels in this Slate article, which essentially paints the schools and everyone in them, including young unemployed grads, as evil “hyper-capitalists.” The only thing anybody cares out in the industry is money.

Though he’s not responding to this story, a law professor makes a good point that if lawyers were concerned about money, they’d go into more lucrative fields:

The promise of financial reward has never been the best reason to attend law school. Historically, lawyers have earned a living billing by the hour, a model that will never produce the sorts of income available in high tech, real estate, finance or industry.

If the Slate article captures what people think of the law, this professor may be onto something in his argument that the image of lawyers, rather than career prospects, is responsible for the decline in applications.

Another law professor argues that it’s a good time to go to law school. Maybe that’s true if you’re in his state of Washington or other states where there aren’t many law schools. If you live in Pennsylvania, you can at least go for half price!

Here’s some law school advice from one of our guests, freelance lawyer Leila Kanani:

Some of our guests explain why they worked before law school. Watch the videos to see if their advice resonates with you. Working for a few years may be a good plan if this analysis is right: supply of law students and demand for lawyers may not reach an equilibrium until 2021.

Whether you go now or later, take this guy’s story as a warning of why you should do some career research before picking a law school.

Finally, no matter where you are in your career, here’s some mental health advice that will help you be successful in your career and life.

Forbes offers 13 things mentally strong people don’t do. Here are a few tips: Don’t give up after failure; the world doesn’t owe you anything; and don’t waste time feeling sorry for yourself.

Also:

Find joy in your work

Keep perspective, whether you failed the bar exam or aced a final.

Are you a mentally strong people person? What professional development tips do you want advice in? Share in the comments sections below.

JD Careers Out There web producer Megan SweasMegan Sweas is a web producer with JD Careers Out There. During a graduate journalism program at University of Southern California, she took a law class for fun. While many of her fellow journalists have made the transition to law, she’ll stick to writing about law careers.

 

GET MY FREE SELF-ASSESSMENT!

Thinking of leaving the law? The best first step you can take is a good look in the mirror. START HERE:

it's free!
You’ll also get periodic updates, reminders & access to career guidance programs sent to your inbox. We respect your privacy. You can unsubscribe via a click at any time.