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Law Career Advice Roundup: Have Fun With Your Career

We have a bit of fun for all ages in the roundup today, starting with a 70-year-old law grad. According to the ABA Journal, she’s studying for the bar exam right now and hopes to become a child advocate — an inspiration for everyone following a dream.

I’m sure she won’t have the same distractions as most law grads preparing for the bar exam. In one of my favorite tweets of the week, Matthew Adams shared a picture of his temptation (click on the link in the retweet to see it). What keeps you from studying?

While too much fun can be a distraction, it’s important to remember that having fun is a part of maintaining a healthy work-life balance. For recent law grad Kaitlyn Kacsuta (@KRKacsuta), running ultras helped her stay balanced in law school, she tweeted in response to an Attorney At Work article on why lawyers run.

Ideally, your work should provide some fun, too. Unfortunately, most Americans don’t find their work stimulating. According to a poll by Gallup, 52 percent of us just feel “meh” about work (as the WSJ article’s title suggests) and another 18 percent are “actively disengaged,” meaning they could be bringing down everybody else.

Considering that the Gallup survey includes everyone from male service-workers in Rhode Island (the least engaged group) to lawyers in California, it’s hard to say how this data is reflected in the field of law. But one interesting fact will resonate with advocates of solo practices and small firms: Employees at small organizations report greater engagement than at large.

If you’re not happy at work, it’s not too late to change directions. As JDCOT founder Marc Luber loves to say, life is too short not to love what you do.

Lawyer Valerie Jarrett said so much at Huffington Post’s first women’s conference. Men, there’s a lot of great advice for you too in this article on 25 lessons taken from it. In #10, Jarrett explained that what looks like a step back might not be. She was happier when she moved from a law firm corner office to a city government cubicle.

How do you make a mid-career transition? Liz Brown tweeted that an internship helped her transition from law to academia. In a post on the Harvard Business Review blog, Carol Fishman Cohen set aside whether or not The Internship is actually funny to dig out a bunch of great tips on making a career transition from the movie.

If you’re looking for a job to transition to, here’s one area that is hot for lawyers: compliance. University of Houston Law Center has a class for both law students and current lawyers to prepare them for a job in compliance.

A final piece of fun, courtesy of the Supreme Court: No matter what you do, your job won’t be fun all the time. As Jeffrey Toobin of the New Yorker tweeted:

But Justice Kagan still had fun in her opinion on the American Trucking case:

How do you bring the fun into your work as a student or lawyer? Or is fun saved for the “life” part of work-life balance?

JD Careers Out There web producer Megan SweasMegan Sweas is a web producer with JD Careers Out There. During a graduate journalism program at University of Southern California, she took a law class for fun. While many of her fellow journalists have made the transition to law, she’ll stick to writing about law careers.

 

GET MY FREE SELF-ASSESSMENT!

Thinking of leaving the law? The best first step you can take is a good look in the mirror. START HERE:

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You’ll also get periodic updates, reminders & access to career guidance programs sent to your inbox. We respect your privacy. You can unsubscribe via a click at any time.