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Law Career Roundup: Find Fulfillment, Leave The Law, and Build Your Network

It’s important to be informed and think about yourself–your strengths and desires–before jumping into a career search. In this week’s roundup, we have some articles for reading and reflecting, before some tips on how to make a change.

Read:

Why is law school so expensive? How does the education compare to the past? Dean David Yellen of Loyola University of Chicago, has another excellent post on Above The Law.

Remember that list that said law attracts psychopaths? (Journalism too–help!) Guest blogger Dan Bowling says that lawyers are no crazier than other folks on The Careerist. (Am I safe here then?) Seriously, though, the article has some good mental health reminders and interesting findings about personality.

Reflect:

Check out Cordell Parvin’s four questions that help you find your “major definite purpose.” To some of you, it may sound a little cheesy, but if you want a fulfilling career, you have to be in touch with who you are and what you want out of life.

Act:

So you’ve reflected, and you’re not so sure about a law career. Now what?

If you’re a 3L, one career coach suggests giving law a shot before moving on to selling shots (or  craft spirits—much classier than shots).

Many of our guests–and JDCOT host Marc Luber–have made career changes, so you’re not alone. It’s hard to know where to start, though. Marc just sat down with Casey Berman this week to talk about his five-step approach to leaving the law. Stay tuned to JDCOT for more on this topic.

In the meantime, here’s what not to do when making a career change.

Connect:

One of Casey’s five steps is to build a network. Easier said than done, you say?

Find out how to start networking if you don’t have a network.

But unless you never leave your house and don’t connect to the Internet, you do have a network. It starts with family, classmates, professors, and friends. Rather than finding a network, you need to deepen and extend your connections so that others can help you with your career.

For that, the best networker in Silicon Valley explains how helping others can help you.

And here’s an idea of how you can be helpful to your fellow law students and lawyers: Share JD Careers Out There with your network. If they’re dealing with career questions, they’ll be glad you sent it along. It’ll help them, help us, and ultimately it’ll help you build your network too!

JD Careers Out There web producer Megan SweasMegan Sweas is a web producer with JD Careers Out There. During a graduate journalism program at University of Southern California, she took a law class for fun. While many of her fellow journalists have made the transition to law, she’ll stick to writing about law careers.

 

GET MY FREE SELF-ASSESSMENT!

Thinking of leaving the law? The best first step you can take is a good look in the mirror. START HERE:

it's free!
You’ll also get periodic updates, reminders & access to career guidance programs sent to your inbox. We respect your privacy. You can unsubscribe via a click at any time.